Formal or Informal Voice

Formal or Informal Voice

When deciding to localize your app, you need to be clear to the translator or localization agency who your target audience is. Is your app a game or social networking chat app? Or is it a financial stocks and shares tracker?
Dealing with Duplicate Strings

Dealing with Duplicate Strings

There are often duplicate strings in apps. Imagine how many times the words "OK" and "Cancel" appear when you use any piece of software. Dealing with duplicate strings can be laborious and time consuming.
What should I get translated?

What should I get translated?

Localizing your app naturally starts with the app itself. When it comes to OSX apps there's quite a bit to think about. If you're sending directly to a translator (not Applingua) then you need to think about extracting the strings in your XIB files into plain text .strings files.
How long does it take to localize an app?

How long does it take to localize an app?

Simple answer: How long is a piece of string? Better answer: Each and every app is different. Different in size, in type, in target market. Each of these differences have an effect on the time it takes to localize an app.
How to Localize App Names

How to Localize App Names

It is possible to localize app names directly within Xcode and you do not need to create multiple versions of the same app. The great and wonderful InfoPlist.strings
Which Dialect Should I Choose?

Which Dialect Should I Choose?

There are several languages which have certain differences depending on where they are spoken. The classic example would be Spanish. Spanish is spoken in 20 different countries worldwide, each with their own regional twist on the language. Sometimes dialects are as simple to compare as British English is to American English, but other times the two dialects differ so greatly that one would not be so easily understood by the other.
Starting Out as an App Translator

Starting Out as an App Translator

The Applingua Knowledge Base tries to cover as many topics as possible regarding app translation. This page will help you navigate some of the other posts if you are starting out as an app translator and translating an app for the first time.
Localizing Your App For The First Time

Localizing Your App For The First Time

If you're new to localization then localizing your app for the first time may feel like a bit of a chore, but it needn't be. You will find several articles in the Knowledge Base helping you out along the way.
Managing Localizations in iTunes Connect

Managing Localizations in iTunes Connect

iTunes Connect (iTC) will automatically detect if your app ships with multiple languages. However, if you want to provide localized App Store descriptions, keywords and screenshots, you will need to set this up through the iTC interface.
Supported iOS Languages

Supported iOS Languages

Current list of supported iOS languages: English (U.S.), English (UK), Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Indonesian, Malay, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Portuguese (Brazil), Romanian, Russian, Slovak, Swedish, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian and Vietnamese.
Testing an App on Your Own Device (iOS)

Testing an App on Your Own Device (iOS)

It is possible to install a development build of an app on your own iOS device for Quality Assurance testing. You may want to test your translation fits within the size constraints of a certain device and whether it also fits the app's context as a whole. This post looks intimidating but it's actually pretty easy!